Login Register

Proposed Cheltenham town centre redevelopment recommended for approval by planning bosses

By Gloucestershire Echo  |  Posted: February 15, 2013

By JACK MAIDMENT POLITICAL REPORTER

THE FUTURE:  An artist's impression of how the  North Place and Portland Street car parks would look if the plans get the go-ahead

THE FUTURE: An artist's impression of how the North Place and Portland Street car parks would look if the plans get the go-ahead

Comments (12)

A SUBSTANTIAL redevelopment project in Cheltenham is set to be given the green light.

Developers have been putting the final touches to plans which will see a large supermarket, a five storey multi-storey car park and more than 100 homes built on car parks opposite The Brewery.

The North Place and Portland Street car parks will be redeveloped if Cheltenham borough councillors agree to officers' recommendations to permit the scheme.

The North Place Development has been identified as a key site to breathe new life into the town.

The sites currently provides 813 car parking spaces.

The supermarket group has not yet been confirmed, but whichever company does move in will have almost 6,000sqm of overall floor space to fill.

The entrance to the superstore will face St Margaret's Road, with a large atrium due to be built.

Room would be set aside in the atrium for a restaurant and 700sqm of space will be earmarked for other shops.

Meanwhile, the housing element of the scheme, which will be split into three distinct north, south and west blocks, will be built on the Portland Street site.

It will be made up of 143 homes with a mix of town houses, apartments and some underground parking. Affordable homes will make up 57 of the units. The development also includes provision for a bus node with three parking bays, a waiting room and information kiosk for passengers. All of this will follow the demolition of the existing buildings and other structures on the car park sites, all of which is located within a conservation area.

Leader of Cheltenham Borough Council, Councillor Steve Jordan (LD, All Saints), said: "Development of this site is a key part of improving the town centre as a whole when it is linked to the other work being done with The Brewery, the shopping arcades and the museum and art gallery.

"It is all positive news for the town. When the council purchased the land the intention was always to develop it. It has just taken a while to get there – obviously subject to planning permission being granted next week."

Councillors on the council's planning committee will discuss the plans next Thursday at 6pm in the Municipal Offices.

Do you have something to say? Leave your comment here...

max 4000 characters

12 comments

  • elgoog  |  February 18 2013, 2:15PM

    Looks as though they have left the supermarket to provide toilet facilities instead of providing a a public toilet.

    Rate   -1
    Report
  • Matt1006  |  February 16 2013, 10:54AM

    So it seems that whilst the Planning Officer (and presumably the Planning team in general) think the proposals are acceptable, the bulk of formal consultees think they aren't. Which also seems to be the general view of Joe Public. I agree that the area needs investment & redevelopment, but it certainly does not warrant a supermarket as part of the scheme, of any size. Totally unnecessary. The original proposals included a hotel (again, unnecessary), and this has been dropped from the formal application, but the developers seem to think there is call for a supermarket, despite apparently not having an operator on-board yet. Won't be a Tesco or Sainsbury as they already have (or are currently creating) town centre shops. Won't be ASDA, Lidl, Aldi, Morrisons or Waitrose (already elsewhere in the town). So perhaps a Spar, or a Nisa, but they are also present in the town. So which supermarket will take it on...? I also wonder about how much more gridlock the scheme will create in the vicinity, both during construction and then once fully occupied. Ultimately it is going down to a vote amongst the members of the Planning Committee, once the application has been presented and debated at committee next Thursday. Most (if not all) of the committee members will have made their mind up before the meeting next week even starts - anybody's guess which way they'll collectively vote. Whatever the outcome, a lot of people won't be happy.

    Rate   1
    Report
  • Abby-7  |  February 16 2013, 8:57AM

    Cheltenham Civic Society, The Architects Panel, English Heritage and the Conservation and Heritage Manager all think the scheme is fundamentally flawed. So why would Mr Martin Chandler the Planning Office recommend approval? The people of Cheltenham deserve better! The task Force must go back to the drawing board or we will regret this for many, many years.

    Rate   3
    Report
  • Judas  |  February 15 2013, 8:19PM

    TiG reported on the congestion around the Brewery a few weeks ago. CBC have re-instated the congestion after temporarily easing it. Now it's their chance to make it worse again....nothing like a success story....and this is nothing like a success story!

    Rate   1
    Report
  • elgoog  |  February 15 2013, 2:55PM

    Cheltenham Betrayed should have been written ten years ago. It is published now in an attempt to expose what has been done to one of the three most beautiful urban areas of Britain. Hollowed out by car-parks, spiked by a tower block of vandalistic profile, its Regency villas desecrated or demolished, Cheltenham is a living indictment of planning procedures and a disturbing testimony to the philistinism of local government. Timothy Mowl's account of Cheltenham's disgraceful recent history will set alarm bells ringing and recriminations flying. After disturbing reminders of what has been lost, he attacks the well-intentioned but wholly misguided pavement politics of the town's Civic leaders. Finally, by focussing on those very few recent buildings that have been designed in sensitive and imaginative awareness of Cheltenham's native classical tradition, he urges an end to that soulless steel and glass modernism which is making towns and cities all over the western world indistinguishable from one another - a treason of architects in the grip of cost-cutting accountants.

    Rate   1
    Report
  • elgoog  |  February 15 2013, 2:44PM

    Read CHELTENHAM BETRAYED by Timothy Mowl..... Cheltenham Betrayed should have been written ten years ago. It is published now in an attempt to expose what has been done to one of the three most beautiful urban areas of Britain. Hollowed out by car-parks, spiked by a tower block of vandalistic profile, its Regency villas desecrated or demolished, Cheltenham is a living indictment of planning procedures and a disturbing testimony to the philistinism of local government. Timothy Mowl's account of Cheltenham's disgraceful recent history will set alarm bells ringing and recriminations flying. After disturbing reminders of what has been lost, he attacks the well-intentioned but wholly misguided pavement politics of the town's Civic leaders. Finally, by focussing on those very few recent buildings that have been designed in sensitive and imaginative awareness of Cheltenham's native classical tradition, he urges an end to that soulless steel and glass modernism which is making towns and cities all over the western world indistinguishable from one another - a treason of architects in the grip of cost-cutting accountants.

    Rate   1
    Report
  • elgoog  |  February 15 2013, 2:42PM
    Rate 0
    Report
  • elgoog  |  February 15 2013, 2:41PM
    Rate   -1
    Report
  • EllJay1  |  February 15 2013, 2:37PM

    Or even third line!

    Rate 0
    Report
  • EllJay1  |  February 15 2013, 2:37PM

    Oh dear, I edited my second line but forgot to take out the last couple of words. Many apologies.

    Rate 0
    Report

      YOUR COMMENTS AWAITING MODERATION

       
       

      MORE NEWS HEADLINES

       
       
       

      MOST POPULAR